Recipe: Elderflower Cheesecake

This is a recipe for elderflower cheesecake. In keeping with the English theme and the historical flavor of the newsletter I decided to take a look in a recipe book that I bought some 30 years ago, called To the King’s Taste. It’s a collection of medieval recipes adapted for modern cooking by Lorna J. Sass.

I was browsing through it and in the dessert section I saw this recipe. I was immediately transported back to a lunch Jean and I had with our old friends Geoff and Ros Peckham at a restaurant in Lewes, East Sussex a couple of years ago. Jean saw an elderflower cordial on the menu and decided to try it. It was very good and she became an immediate fan. When I saw this recipe I knew that this was what I’d been looking for. 

(Dried elderflowers are available online and at some wine and beer-making supply stores. I’d read that they are sometimes sold at Mexican grocery stores but when I went looking for them in my neighborhood I had no luck.)

 




a nine-inch unbaked pie crust 

3 Tbs of dried elderflowers

4 Tbs heavy cream 

½ cup of sugar 

½ lb farmers cheese 

½ lb ricotta cheese 

2 tsp dry bread crumbs 

6 egg whites beaten until stiff but not dry 

 

 

Bake the pie crust at 425º F for 10 mins 

Soak the elderflowers in the cream for about 10 minutes 

Add sugar and stir until dissolved

Push the cheeses through a strainer with the back of a spoon 

Combine cheeses with elderflower-cream mixture. Add bread crumbs. Blend thoroughly 

Fold in stiff egg whites

Pour mixture into pie crust

Bake at 375º F for about 50 minutes until firm but not dry. 

Turn off the heat and allow to cool in oven with door open for about 15 minutes 

3 comments

  • Mark Sheehan

    Mark Sheehan Indiana

    In my foreign land of Indiana, the liquor stores have recently been offering little airline bottles of "St. Germain" (not to be confused with Master Rakoczi -- or is it?), an elder flower liqueur. I gather it makes a nice cocktail when added to champaign.

    In my foreign land of Indiana, the liquor stores have recently been offering little airline bottles of "St. Germain" (not to be confused with Master Rakoczi -- or is it?), an elder flower liqueur. I gather it makes a nice cocktail when added to champaign.

  • Mark Sheehan

    Mark Sheehan Indiana

    Make that Champagne.

    Make that Champagne.

  • Mick

    Mick Aurora

    You can also make your own syrup and add it to seltzer water. But, yes, I've been seeing more elderflower liqueur around -- maybe it's a trend?

    You can also make your own syrup and add it to seltzer water. But, yes, I've been seeing more elderflower liqueur around -- maybe it's a trend?

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